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Entries for 'asemyonov'


The 17th annual Tiger Day Festival was held in Vladivostok on September 25. This year’s event continued the trend of ever increasing size and interest, with an approximately 15,000 participants and an estimated 50,000 attendees. The event kicked off with a huge parade that included 91 groups representing schools and both governmental and non-governmental agencies engaged in environmental protection. The parade ended in the main square downtown, where entertainment on the main stage was supplemented by a variety of activities for kids were organized around the square. Read more...


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Sunday, August 21, 2016

THE CINDERELLA STORY CONTINUES…

 

New photographs just released from Bastak Reserve in the Russian Far East confirm that a feline Cinderella story continues to unfold. Brought into captivity as a nearly starved, 3-month old cub, the tigress that became known as Zolushka (Russian for Cinderella) flourished in a rehabilitation center designed to prepare her for life back in the wild. Without a mother (probably lost to poachers) Zolushka learned how to kill natural wild prey presented to her in the rehabilitation center, where she was kept far from people to preserve her innate fear of humans. Read more here.

  

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National Geographic video channel recently announced a new documentary on Amur tiger conservation issues made by Emmanuel Rondeau. We decided to accompany this with a short introduction by Dale Miquelle director of WCS Russia about his acquaintance with Emmanuel. We offer you to watch this short video and also find excerpts from an interview of Emmanuel taken by Rachel Link from National Geographic. Read more here.

  

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Monday, February 01, 2016

INTRODUCTION SEMINAR ON CAMERATRAPS

 

A training seminar titled "Using camera traps for monitoring and research of wildlife populations" took place over January 25-30 2016 in the Sikhote-Alin Reserve and at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s research center in Ternei. The seminar was attended by over 30 participants from different Nature Reserves, National Parks and Scientific Institutes from all over the Russia. 

Its goal was to provide background information for those wildlife practitioners who recently started using camera traps, for those who would like to start using them, and for those who already have some experience but would like more information on how to analyze and manage data they obtained. Read more here.

  

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Thursday, December 10, 2015

CINDERELLA BECOMES A MOTHER!

 

Orphaned tiger cub, rehabilitated and released into the wilds of the Russian Far East, has cubs. WCS and partners report the news from Bastak Reserve, a 162 square mile (420 km2) protected area in the Pri-Amur region of the Russian Far East, where a tiger cub who lost her mother and nearly died, became a “Cinderella” and is now a mother. Anxious waiting by biologists in the area was rewarded on December 9, 2015, when Ivan Podkolnokov, the reserve inspector responsible for monitoring Zolushka – Russian for Cinderella – returned from the field with historic photos: Zolushka standing under a huge Korean pine tree, with two small cubs huddled underneath her. Read more here.

  

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Breakthrough for safeguarding wildlife and natural resources in the southern Russian Far East. Ternei County in the Russian Province of Primorye represents some of the best Amur tiger habitat in the world, with dense forests of oak and pine teeming with deer, boar, and other tiger prey species. Except for protected areas (where the ban on logging has always been strictly enforced), the region has been targeted by logging companies over the last thirty years, with the development of a dense network of logging roads to access and remove timber. Read more here

  

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The process of immobilization and the trauma of the long trip to the Primamur (as described in Episodes 2 and 3) was really the easy part for our five young tigers just released into Amurskaya Oblast and the Jewish Autonomous Region. The real challenge for these tigers would come after release, and the questions were many. Will they acclimate to their new surroundings? Will they successfully learn to hunt in the wild? Where will they decide is “home” and how will they demark their home ranges? Will males and females stay together, or find separate non-overlapping home ranges? Therefore, in many ways, the first month of live in the wild represents the most critical period for these young, inexperienced tigers.  Read more here

  

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Just as the three young tigers named Ilona, Boris, and Kuzma were realizing new-found freedom in Amurskaya Oblast, a second convoy with two more cubs was preparing to leave the Alekseevka facility in Primorskii Krai. Ustin and Svetlana, a male and female found separately as abandoned cubs in Primorskii Krai in the 2012-2013 winter, were now well prepared for their release in the Zhuravlinii (“Crane”) Wildlife Refuge in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast (JAO).  Read more here

  

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In our last update we described how three tigers cubs, named Ilona, Boris, and Kuzya, had been immobilized at the Alekseevka Rehabilitation Center in Primorskii Krai and sent on the long journey to the Amurskaya Oblast, a region that had not seen resident tigers for decades. The tigers were transported through Primorskii Krai, Khabarovskii Krai, and the Jewish Autonomous Oblast in custom-built cages on trailers.  Read more here

  

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On May 19th, the next step in returning tigers to the Pri-Amur Region of Russia began. Specialists from Wildlife Conservation Society, Special Tiger Inspection and Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution were able to dart the teenage tigress Ilona in her expansive enclosure at the Inspection Tiger’s Rehabilitation Center in Alekseevka, Primorskii Krai. Within an hour, after blood samples and measurements were taken, and a radiocollar was put on, she was placed in her transport cage in preparation for the long trip west.  Early the nextmorning, two brothers – Kuzya and Boris – of similar age but unrelated to Ilona, were also darted, with each placed in their private shipping crate ready for about 1300 km trip to Amur Oblast and Zhelundinskii Wildlife Refuge, their new intended home. 
Read more here

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Data in recent years has confirmed that infectious diseases can seriously impact the populations of rare animal species, including Amur tigers. As previously reported, Amur tigers were recently exposed to canine distemper virus, a disease common among wild and domestic animals (including dogs) that share habitat with tigers. Therefore, tiger population health depends on controlling the spread of infectious diseases in wild and domesticated animals. To elucidate the role that wild and domestic animals play in the possible infection of Amur tigers and other carnivores, the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Russia Program has undertaken a study involving Russian and foreign veterinarians and zoologists. Read more here

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Sunday, February 02, 2014

AILING AMUR TIGER STILL A MYSTERY

ailing amur tiger

WCS Russia staff captured an incapacitated Amur tiger in the Amur region of the Russian Far East, but what ails the tiger is still a mystery. Sunday evening WCS staff members Nikolai and Alexander Rybin assisted in immobilizing the cat a second time to obtain x-rays and samples needed to determine whether diseases are affecting the tiger. Although 300-400 tigers live in Khabarovskii and Primorskii Provinces of the Russian Far East, tigers disappeared from the more western Amur Province more than 30 years ago. Yet WCS received the unusual request to assist the Russian government agency Inspection Tiger to track down and capture a wounded tiger reported in the region. WCS has the only specialists in the Russian Far East trained in the capture and immobilization of the big cats. Read more

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lynx cameratrap WCS Russia

Recently, one of our camera traps in southwest Primorye captured a Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx). This might seem like nothing particularly unusual, but this is noteworthy because this is the first time in the ten years of camera trapping in southwest Primorye that this species has been documented. And not just by us—our colleagues who have also been working with camera traps in other parts of southern Primorye, have confirmed that this is the first lynx photograph they’ve seen as well. And there it is, walking on a game trail usually walked by tigers and leopards, as though nothing were out of the ordinary. 

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Friday, December 16, 2011

TO CATCH A POACHER

lynx cameratrap WCS Russia

At the end of November 2011, a one day training workshop took place at Sikhote-Alin State Nature Biosphere Reserve in Primorski Krai (Russian Far East),  to train inspectors in judicial procedure. The training will hopefully increase the rate of successful prosecutions that can be made against poachers who are apprehended inside the protected area. The training forms part of a collaboration between four important protected areas in Primorski Krai, the WCS,  USAID, Phoenix Fund and Zoological Society of London.  Please download the full text here

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