Fast Facts - STP

Alt Text
WCS researcher Bart Schleyer uses
telemetry to locate a radio-collared
tiger. Radio collars allow researchers to
track tigers year-round, learning
about how tigers live, and what they
need to survive.

After tracking over 60 radio-collared tigers since 1992, WCS has uncovered a wealth of new information about tigers at the northern limits of their range:

  • Approximately 80% of tiger mortality in Russia is caused by humans. Protection from human-induced mortality would increase tiger density and reproduction, as tigresses could live long enough to ensure their offspring’s reproductive success.
  • Tigers produce on average 2.4 cubs every 21 months, but about 50% of cubs die before reaching one year of age (many die when their mothers are poached).
  • Each female tiger requires about 250-450 km2; therefore the largest protected area within the tiger range (Sikhote-Alin Reserve, 4,000 km2) shelters only 10-15 tigresses.
  • Red deer, wild boar and sika deer make up about 85% of the tiger's diet, so managing these species is vital to tiger conservation.
  • Dispersing young tigers may wander over 200 km in search of their own territory.
  • Amur tiger mortality is greater in areas with roads than in remote roadless areas.

 

Back to the Siberian Tiger Project main page.

 

 

 

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS (2017-2018)

Statistical Analysis in Program R: November 2017, Sikhote-Alin Research Center, Ternei, Russia
In contrast to several decades ago, biological studies today must be backed by rigorous statistical methods to be considered credible. The statistical program known simply as R is currently being used in an overwhelming majority of biological studies being published today. With huge analytical advantages over Statistica, the statistics program most-used in Russia, R is actually much easier to use (once an initial learning curve has been mastered). Our goal with this workshop is to help participants overcome their fear of statistics in general, and of R in particular. This workshop will target graduate students and early-career professionals.